Marriage and Annulment (Teachings of the Orthodox Church) Christianity. Orthodoxy. Catholicism. Sense of life. Articles for Christians.
If I speak with the languages of men and of angels, but don't have love, I have become sounding brass, or a clanging cymbal.                If I have the gift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and all knowledge; and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but don't have love, I am nothing.                If I dole out all my goods to feed the poor, and if I give my body to be burned, but don't have love, it profits me nothing.                Love is patient and is kind; love doesn't envy. Love doesn't brag, is not proud,                doesn't behave itself inappropriately, doesn't seek its own way, is not provoked, takes no account of evil; 13:6 doesn't rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth;                bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.                Love never fails. But where there are prophecies, they will be done away with. Where there are various languages, they will cease. Where there is knowledge, it will be done away with.               
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Marriage and Annulment (Teachings of the Orthodox Church)
   

QUESTION:

My fiance and I are both baptized Catholics. I was never married and she is divorced. If we both were to convert to the Orthodox faith, could we be married in the Orthodox Church even though she has not received an annulment from the Catholic Church?

ANSWER:

If you and your fiance, both baptized Roman Catholics, were to convert to Orthodoxy, you could indeed be married in the Orthodox Church. The Orthodox Church does not have a process comparable to the Roman Catholic “annullment,” which ultimately determines that the relationship between a couple was, in fact, not a valid marriage.

The question with which you would be confronted, however, would not involve marriage but, rather, the reasons for your conversion. To convert means to change one’s mind and heart, not just one’s religion. Conversion to Orthodox Christianity involves a sincere desire to follow Christ according to the fullness of His revelation as received by the Orthodox Christian Church and lived, experienced and shared throughout her 2000-year existence. To convert simply to avoid the need to obtain a Roman Catholic annulment would not, in fact, fit the definition or experience of conversion.






Published - January 2011









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