Lives of Saints - St. Theodore of Sykeon (613AD) Christianity - Books
If I speak with the languages of men and of angels, but don't have love, I have become sounding brass, or a clanging cymbal.                If I have the gift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and all knowledge; and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but don't have love, I am nothing.                If I dole out all my goods to feed the poor, and if I give my body to be burned, but don't have love, it profits me nothing.                Love is patient and is kind; love doesn't envy. Love doesn't brag, is not proud,                doesn't behave itself inappropriately, doesn't seek its own way, is not provoked, takes no account of evil; 13:6 doesn't rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth;                bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.                Love never fails. But where there are prophecies, they will be done away with. Where there are various languages, they will cease. Where there is knowledge, it will be done away with.               
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St. Theodore of Sykeon (613AD)
   

St. Theodore of Sykeon was monk and bishop of Anastasiopolis in Galatia. From infancy he was so given to prayer that as a schoolboy he often deprived himself of food to spend time in church. At an early age he shut himself up, first in his mother's cellar and then in a cave under a disused chapel. The desire for isolation led him subsequently to live in a cave in a nearby mountain. He later assumed the monastic habit when on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and received ordination to the priesthood from his bishop. His life was extremely austere, living on vegetables, but of these he partook most sparingly, and wore an iron girdle about his body. He was endowed with the gifts of prophesy and of miracles including those of healing. He was consecrated bishop of Anastasiopolis, but after ten years succeeded in obtaining leave to life as a monk. At this time he was invited by the emperor and the patriarch to visit Constantinople where he miraculously cured the emperor's son of elephantiasis. He returned to Sykeon where he died on May 18, 613.

Source: http://www.orthodoxchristian.info

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